Nº. 1 of  28

Inside A Letter Box


             noctes illustratas
             (the night has houses)
                                                      and the shadow of the fabulous
                                          broken into handfuls—these
can be placed at regular intervals,
                                                         candles
walking down the streets at times eclipsed by trees.



 Text: Cole Swenson, The Invention of Streetlights. Photograph: Lyonel Feininger, Untitled (Night View of Trees and Street Lamp, Burgkühnauer Allee, Dessau). 1928. Gelatin silver print, 17.7 x 23 cm.
             noctes illustratas
             (the night has houses)
                                                      and the shadow of the fabulous
                                          broken into handfuls—these
can be placed at regular intervals,
                                                         candles
walking down the streets at times eclipsed by trees.

Text: Cole Swenson, The Invention of Streetlights. Photograph: Lyonel Feininger, Untitled (Night View of Trees and Street Lamp, Burgkühnauer Allee, Dessau). 1928. Gelatin silver print, 17.7 x 23 cm.
Guillermo Kuitca, Ein Deutsches Requiem. 2002. Mixed media on paper, 21.6 x 27.9 cm. 

Guillermo Kuitca, Ein Deutsches Requiem. 2002. Mixed media on paper, 21.6 x 27.9 cm. 

(Source: artnet.com)

Jorge Macchi. Nocturne, variation on Nocturne No. 1 by Erik Satie. 2002. Paper and nails, 20 x 24 in. 

Jorge Macchi. Nocturne, variation on Nocturne No. 1 by Erik Satie. 2002. Paper and nails, 20 x 24 in. 

(Source: bombsite.com)

August Strindberg, Wave VII. Between 1900 and 1901. Oil on canvas, 57 x 36 cm.

August Strindberg, Wave VII. Between 1900 and 1901. Oil on canvas, 57 x 36 cm.

(Source: musee-orsay.fr)


I wish to become a swallow living in an evergreen tree, so that I too could forever enjoy feelings of love for you, the one whose sash I untied.
—Sakazuki no Komendo

Illustration from The Bird Book by Kitagawa Utamaro. Printed in colors from woodblocks, with blind embossing and pipette-blown pigment. Published c. 1790 by Tsutaya Juzaburo (Edo). 258 x 188 mm. Translation by John T. Carpenter.
Explore Utamaro’s trio of natural history books on the themes of insects, shells, and birds.

I wish to become a swallow
living in an evergreen tree,
so that I too could forever
enjoy feelings of love for you,
the one whose sash I untied.

—Sakazuki no Komendo

Illustration from The Bird Book by Kitagawa Utamaro. Printed in colors from woodblocks, with blind embossing and pipette-blown pigment. Published c. 1790 by Tsutaya Juzaburo (Edo). 258 x 188 mm. Translation by John T. Carpenter.

Explore Utamaro’s trio of natural history books on the themes of insects, shells, and birds.

    Weak rhymes that fall on verbs
and time-words, these are the strong ones.
Noun and adjective
are backwaters in the clear stream,
incidental to the verb
in the lyric grammar
of Today on the way to Tomorrow,
of Yesterday that is Still.

—Antonio Machado. From My Portfolio, verse VII. 1924. trans. Alan S. Trueblood.

Sir, say no more.
Within me ’t is as if
The green and climbing eyesight of a cat
Crawled near my mind’s poor birds.

—Trumbull Stickney, Sir, Say no More.

Federico García Lorca’s passport.  Spain, June 1929.  Fundación Federico García Lorca, Madrid. 

Federico García Lorca’s passport.  Spain, June 1929.  Fundación Federico García Lorca, Madrid. 

Federico García Lorca’s Columbia University library card.  New York, 1929.  Fundación Federico García Lorca, Madrid. 

Federico García Lorca’s Columbia University library card.  New York, 1929.  Fundación Federico García Lorca, Madrid. 

Map of Sardinia from The Book on Navigation, by Piri Reis. Late 17th c.-early 18th c. Ink and pigments on laid European paper, 34 x 24 cm. Explore The Book on Navigation here.

Map of Sardinia from The Book on Navigation, by Piri Reis. Late 17th c.-early 18th c. Ink and pigments on laid European paper, 34 x 24 cm. Explore The Book on Navigation here.

Masahisa Fukase. Erimo Cape, Japan (from the series The Solitude of Ravens). 1976. Gelatin silver print, 78 x 53.3 cm. 

Masahisa Fukase. Erimo Cape, Japan (from the series The Solitude of Ravens). 1976. Gelatin silver print, 78 x 53.3 cm. 

(Source: robertmann.com)

In other Motes,
Of other Myths
Your requisition be.
The Prism never held the Hues,
It only heard them play —


Emily Dickinson, 1664. c. 1884. The Poems of Emily Dickinson: Volumes 1-3, ed. R.W. Franklin. (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1998).

Albrecht Dürer, Self-portrait of the Sick Dürer, c.1512-13. Pen and ink with watercolour on paper, 12.7 x 11.7 cm.  The inscription reads:

Where the yellow spot is, to which I point with my finger, there it hurts.

trans. E. Panofksy, The Life and Art of Albrecht Dürer.
(Image source: The Prado)

Albrecht Dürer, Self-portrait of the Sick Dürer, c.1512-13. Pen and ink with watercolour on paper, 12.7 x 11.7 cm.  The inscription reads:

Where the yellow spot is, to which I point with my finger, there it hurts.

trans. E. Panofksy, The Life and Art of Albrecht Dürer.

(Image source: The Prado)

On hearing of a powerful love tremble and be moved
like an aesthete. But then, contented,
remember how many your imagination fashioned for you: those
first: and that the others—lesser—that in your life you’ve
experienced and enjoyed, those more real, and tangible.—
You were not deprived of loves like these.

— C.P. Cavafy, Hearing of Love. 1911. trans. Daniel Mendelsohn.

Emily Dickinson, We Talked With Each Other About Each Other, c. 1879, Amherst Manuscript #514. Pencil on Envelope, 1 sheet, 5 1/10 x 7 9/10 inches (13 x 20 cm). 

Emily Dickinson, We Talked With Each Other About Each Other, c. 1879, Amherst Manuscript #514. Pencil on Envelope, 1 sheet, 5 1/10 x 7 9/10 inches (13 x 20 cm). 

(Source: drawingcenter.org)

Nº. 1 of  28